Jane Lynch and Jane Fonda bust out the workout moves to help fight Alzheimer’s

Between them they have a combined age of 102.

But watching them bust out the workout moves you’d think Jane Lynch and Jane Fonda were still teenagers. The two Janes took to the stage yesterday in Long Beach, California in front of a packed convention center, as they helped co-host California First Lady Maria Shriver’s women’s conference.

The two actresses are both obviously in top physical shape and they embarked in a vigorous workout, encouraging the crowd to move along with them. It’s not surprising they’re so fit – 50-year-old Lynch seems to spend the majority of her time in sweats these days as she plays a PE teacher on the hit TV show Glee. And Fonda, 72, is a workout fanatic, even producing her own series of top selling workout tapes during the 1980s.

It was a star-studded affair with Peter Gallagher, Soleil Moon Frye, Rob Lowe and Leeza Gibbons all lending their support along with Fonda and Lynch.

Fifty-four-year-old Shriver is a long- time advocate for families struggling with Alzheimer’s. Her own father, Sargent, has battled the disease since being diagnosed in 2003.

Since that time, Shriver has been deeply involved in raising awareness and funding for Alzheimer care and research.

via Jane Lynch and Jane Fonda bust out the workout moves to help fight Alzheimer’s | Mail Online.

Ohio woman learns to be caregiver to mother with Alzheimer’s disease

There are four books on the table beside Theresa Hawk’s bed: What to Expect When You’re Expecting, What to Expect The Toddler Years, Alzheimer’s Early Stages: First Steps for Families, Friends and Caregivers, and Regina Brett’s latest book, God Never Blinks: 50 Lessons for Life’s Little Detours.

These are not books prescribed to her from her book club or The New York Times best seller list, as if to suggest Theresa, a Mayfield Heights resident, has time to belong to a book club or even read The New York Times. Rather these books are required reading for a set of life circumstances that she never expected.

Around the holidays in 2008, Theresa and her family began recognizing the fact her mother, Virginia, was having some real cognitive problems including memory loss. The problems came to a head when Virginia wanted to get a relative’s telephone number and went to call information. Instead of dialing “411″, she dialed “911″.

When the police arrived to investigate the call, Virginia had no recollection of using the phone at all. Theresa began to seek a diagnosis of her mother’s growing problem. Virginia was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2009 at age 60.

via Mayfield Heights woman learns to be caregiver to mother with Alzheimer’s disease | cleveland.com.

Survey: Alzheimer’s caregivers’ concerns

Family caregivers’ greatest concerns about the progression of a loved one’s Alzheimer’s disease are memory loss 41 percent, personal safety 33 percent and confusion 27 percent, finds a new survey.

The poll of 524 caregivers also found that 67 percent named at least one cognitive or thinking skills’ change in their loved one as a main concern; 55 percent said caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s has taken a toll on their own health; and 60 percent said they felt overwhelmed.

via Survey Reveals Alzheimer’s Caregivers’ Top Concerns.

‘Wretches and Jabberers’: A film that takes autism around the world

No one is going to mistake Wretches and Jabberers for Easy Rider. Yet the new documentary from director Gerardine Wurzburg could arguably be filed under “road movies” together with the iconic sixties film.

Wretches and Jabberers finds its story not only in the lives of two Vermont men with autism, Larry Bissonnette and Tracy Thresher, but also in their 2009 cross-cultural journey when they traveled with their assistants, Pascal Cheng G’79 and Harvey Lavoy, to meet other autistic individuals, educators, and advocates in Sri Lanka, Japan, and Finland. The film is a logical extension from Wurzburg’s past work, which includes Educating Peter, an Academy Award nominated film about a boy with Down syndrome in a public school classroom, and Autism is a World, which follows a young woman with autism as she goes to college.

“Our goal was to shine a light on autism internationally. Larry and Tracy’s journey allowed us to portray the global face of autism through the personal stories of six men and women throughout the world,” Wurzburg says.

via University Communications : University of Vermont.

Family, friends may spot early dementia best

When it comes to the onset of early Alzheimer’s disease, a person’s family and close friends are better able to spot the initial signs of trouble than traditional screening by doctors, new research suggests.

The finding, reported online in the journal Brain, is based on the apparent accuracy of observations gathered from family and friends in response to a carefully designed dementia questionnaire that is available in several languages and is already in use in clinics worldwide.

Called Ascertain Dementia 8 (or AD8), the questionnaire is designed to draw out observations on someone’s judgment, activity levels, learning capacity, forgetfulness, repetitiveness and overall thinking skills.

Answers given by family and friends to the questionnaire, which can be completed in two minutes, appear to correlate accurately with biological indicators of Alzheimer’s disease more often than standard physician testing, the researchers found.

via Family Friends Seem Best at Spotting Early Dementia – MSN Health & Fitness – Alzheimer’s Disease.

Tips for getting Alzheimer’s patients to eat and drink more

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that robs people of their ability to take care of themselves. It is a progressive disease which creates confusion and lack of movement in muscles. Alzheimer’s patients sometimes do not eat, and refuse meals because they do not recognize food. They have lost their sense of taste and smell, and they have difficulties swallowing food.

You will have to begin by identifying the reasons why they are not eating.

via Tips for getting Alzheimers patients to eat and drink more – by Jennifer Mcdonald – Helium.

Shriver Report examines impact of Alzheimer’s on women as caregivers and patients

California first lady Maria Shriver is harnessing the power of her prominent California Women’s Conference to raise awareness about Alzheimer’s disease and its impact on American women.

California’s first lady uses the awards ceremony to honor humanitarian efforts.

In the lead-up to her annual conference on women’s issues, on Oct. 15, Shriver will join with the Alzheimer’s Association to release a comprehensive study detailing how the devastating disease affects women as caregivers, advocates and patients.

Featuring essays written by personalities from the worlds of politics, entertainment and media, “The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Takes on Alzheimer’s” gives an honest and diverse look at the personal, professional and policy dimensions of the disease.

via Shriver Report Examines Impact of Alzheimer’s on Women as Caregivers and Patients – ABC News.

Alzheimer’s Caregiving: Benefits CheckUp

Bob DeMarco of Alzheimer’s Reading Room points to a great resource, Benefits Check Up,  in this post:

Benefits Check Up is one of my favorite sites if you are looking for programs to assist you as an Alzheimer’s caregiver.

This service from the National Council on Aging will give you real help in identifying all the services that are available to the elderly or to someone that has Alzheimer’s disease. They ask specifically if the person has Alzheimer’s disease in their questionnaire.

The thing I like best about this website is that it streamlines the process of finding programs that could be of benefit to you. This is accomplished through one simple questionnaire that searches all national/Federal, regional and local assistance programs.

You can answer the questions for someone that is older or suffering from dementia. You answer as if they were answering the questionnaire. You do it for them.

Don’t overlook this opportunity, if you are currently caring for someone and not working or on a low income, you can also answer for yourself to determine if there are programs available for you. I find that Alzheimer’s caregivers often over look this option.

via Alzheimer’s Caregiving — Benefits CheckUp.

Seven easy ways to help a family diagnosed with autism

From The Huffington Post’s Elaine Hall, a thoughtful post on how to help out a family with an autistic child or adult. Autism caregivers will probably appreciate your help!

We’ve all heard the news: one in 91 children are now being diagnosed with autism in the United States alone. This is staggering. Today, almost everyone knows someone with autism. And yet, with all the talk about cures, causes and concerns, there is rarely any information on how we can support a family with this diagnosis. All too often, because folks don’t know what to do, they do nothing! Even to the extent of avoiding the family out of fear, or just out of not knowing what to do or say. In this post, I hope to show how simple acts of kindness can make a world of difference for families who have children with autism.

Elaine Hall: 7 Easy Ways to Help a Family Diagnosed With Autism.

New store caters to caretakers of autistic children

Do you believe in angels?

The Moore family does — so much so, they’ve called on the celestial beings to market Angels for Autism, a 2,000-square-foot retail store in Rio del Plaza in Cathedral City that holds potential to empower and inspire.

Founded by LaVeda and Dean Moore, parents of 9-year-old Evan, the store is a one-stop shopping zone to serve parents, teachers and therapists of special needs children — some 6,500 of whom live in the Coachella Valley.

It offers products in a “stare-free” environment for children with autism and special needs in the areas of sensory integration, socialization, life skills, fine motor skills and therapy.

via New store caters to caretakers of autistic children | mydesert.com | The Desert Sun.