Alzheimer’s warning sign – money problems

The country is observing National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month in November. Here’s an important story from The New York Times on an  early warning sign of Alzheimer’s – a problem handling finances.

Renee Packel used to have a typical suburban life. Her husband, Arthur, was a lawyer and also sold insurance. They lived in a town house just outside Philadelphia, and Mrs. Packel took care of their home and family.

One day, it all came crashing down. The homeowners’ association called asking for their fees. To Mrs. Packel’s surprise, her husband had simply stopped paying them. Then she learned he had stopped writing checks to his creditors, too.

It turned out that Mr. Packel was developing Alzheimer’s disease and had forgotten how to handle money. When she tried to pay their bills, Mrs. Packel, who enlisted the help of a forensic accountant, could not find most of the couple’s money.

“It just disappeared,” she said.

What happened to the Packels is all too common, Alzheimer’s experts say. New research shows that one of the first signs of impending dementia is an inability to understand money and credit, contracts and agreements.

via Alzheimer’s Warning Sign – Money Problems – Vanishing Mind – NYTimes.com.

Jane Lynch and Jane Fonda bust out the workout moves to help fight Alzheimer’s

Between them they have a combined age of 102.

But watching them bust out the workout moves you’d think Jane Lynch and Jane Fonda were still teenagers. The two Janes took to the stage yesterday in Long Beach, California in front of a packed convention center, as they helped co-host California First Lady Maria Shriver’s women’s conference.

The two actresses are both obviously in top physical shape and they embarked in a vigorous workout, encouraging the crowd to move along with them. It’s not surprising they’re so fit – 50-year-old Lynch seems to spend the majority of her time in sweats these days as she plays a PE teacher on the hit TV show Glee. And Fonda, 72, is a workout fanatic, even producing her own series of top selling workout tapes during the 1980s.

It was a star-studded affair with Peter Gallagher, Soleil Moon Frye, Rob Lowe and Leeza Gibbons all lending their support along with Fonda and Lynch.

Fifty-four-year-old Shriver is a long- time advocate for families struggling with Alzheimer’s. Her own father, Sargent, has battled the disease since being diagnosed in 2003.

Since that time, Shriver has been deeply involved in raising awareness and funding for Alzheimer care and research.

via Jane Lynch and Jane Fonda bust out the workout moves to help fight Alzheimer’s | Mail Online.

Florida man with Alzheimer’s wanders, rescued by deputies using SafetyNet System

Sheriff’s deputies in Hillsborough County, Florida, used SafetyNet to rescue a wandering man with Alzheimer’s disease in just 35 minutes this week.

The 75-year-old man’s wife called 911 when she realized her husband had gone missing during a walk and informed a dispatcher that her husband was enrolled in the SafetyNet service.

SafetyNet enables public safety agencies to more quickly find and rescue individuals with cognitive conditions who are prone to wandering and becoming lost. Clients wear bracelets that emit Radio Frequency signals that can be tracked by local public safety officials.

During Monday’s rescue, ground and air units picked up a signal from the man’s SafetyNet bracelet. He was found  unharmed walking several blocks from home.

The SafetyNet service, which has been available to Hillsborough County resident since September 2009, provides peace of mind to caregivers of people at risk of wandering by using the most effective technology available today for public safety agencies.

Ohio woman learns to be caregiver to mother with Alzheimer’s disease

There are four books on the table beside Theresa Hawk’s bed: What to Expect When You’re Expecting, What to Expect The Toddler Years, Alzheimer’s Early Stages: First Steps for Families, Friends and Caregivers, and Regina Brett’s latest book, God Never Blinks: 50 Lessons for Life’s Little Detours.

These are not books prescribed to her from her book club or The New York Times best seller list, as if to suggest Theresa, a Mayfield Heights resident, has time to belong to a book club or even read The New York Times. Rather these books are required reading for a set of life circumstances that she never expected.

Around the holidays in 2008, Theresa and her family began recognizing the fact her mother, Virginia, was having some real cognitive problems including memory loss. The problems came to a head when Virginia wanted to get a relative’s telephone number and went to call information. Instead of dialing “411″, she dialed “911″.

When the police arrived to investigate the call, Virginia had no recollection of using the phone at all. Theresa began to seek a diagnosis of her mother’s growing problem. Virginia was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2009 at age 60.

via Mayfield Heights woman learns to be caregiver to mother with Alzheimer’s disease | cleveland.com.

Understanding of Alzheimer’s in the Latino community

A new survey shows the Latino community need more information and support services on Alzheimer’s disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.

The association has developed a Spanish-language workshop, “Know the 10 Signs,” available at chapters nationwide.

From the Alzheimer’s Association “Hispanic Perceptions of Alzheimer’s Disease” survey:

* While more than 90 percent of those surveyed knew that Alzheimer’s is a progressive brain disease that causes memory loss and problems with thinking and behavior, only half (53 percent) knew it is a fatal disease.

* Seventy three percent of those surveyed felt that knowing the 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s is very important. However,

  • Only thirty nine percent of people survey knew that trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships is a warning sign of Alzheimer’s.
  • Only thirty eight percent of people survey knew that challenges in planning or solving problems is warning sign of Alzheimer’s.
  • Only thirty four percent of those surveyed knew that withdrawal from work or social activities is a warning sign of Alzheimer’s.
  • Fifty four percent of those surveyed incorrectly thought forgetting which day it is but remembering later is a warning sign of Alzheimer’s.
  • Forty percent of those surveyed incorrectly thought losing things from time to time is a warning sign of Alzheimer’s.

The survey was funded by the MetLife Foundation.

via New Survey Shows Understanding of Alzheimer’s in the Latino Community Does Not Correspond with… — CHICAGO, Oct. 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ –.

Police study wandering of Alzheimer’s, dementia patients for search and rescue

Steven Williams, a San Francisco firefighter who lives in Oakland, Calif., had just finished a 24-hour shift when he returned home and told his mother’s caretaker she could take the rest of the day off.

His 88-year-old mother, Katherine Oppenheimer, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and requires constant supervision. Still, Williams thought he could get away with a 15-minute nap.

He awoke to find that she had wandered out of the home. “It was one of the scariest experiences I’ve ever had,” he said. “I would rather run into a burning building than go through that again.”

This time, Williams’ harrowing moment ended well. He found his mother quickly, a few floors up in the same apartment building where she lives. But like a growing number of families coping with the devastating effects of Alzheimer’s disease, he fears a repeat episode.

In 1980, about 2.8 million Americans had Alzheimer’s disease – the most common form of dementia. But with longer life expectancies and advanced treatment for other diseases such as cancer, that figure has nearly doubled in 2010, to 5.3 million, according to Elizabeth Edgerly, a chief program officer with the Alzheimer’s Association, a national advocacy group.

In all, 42 percent of people 85 and older will get Alzheimer’s, Edgerly said.To deal with the increasing numbers, police agencies are training officers how to search for wanderers.

“The ability to recognize dementia has improved over the last 20 years,” said Rick Kovar, emergency services manager for the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Office. “The science behind searching for people with Alzheimer’s has become efficient and scientific.”

via Path of dementia less of a mystery – Family – Modbee.com.

World Alzheimer’s Day is September 21

World Alzheimer’s Day — Tuesday, Sep. 21 — is the only day of the year that unites people around the globe in the dementia movement. If you are reading this you are part of the movement! But don’t stop reading yet — take time to process the following numbers.

The number of people with Alzheimer’s disease or a dementia worldwide is 35 million. It is expected to nearly double every 20 years, to 65.7 million in 2030 and 115.4 million in 2050. Nearly 5.3 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s, and that number is expected to be over 16 million by 2050.

Chances are you know someone with this devastating disease that is progressive, fatal and robs a person of their ability to remember and reason. Perhaps you are one of the 200,000 Georgians who lives with this disease, or one of the nearly 11 million Americans providing care for someone with Alzheimer’s. Perhaps you are a woman that has reached age 55, and has a 1-in-6 chance of developing Alzheimer’s in her lifetime.

via Alzheimer’s, dementia sufferers face challenges — and you can help | The Augusta Chronicle.

Tips for getting Alzheimer’s patients to eat and drink more

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that robs people of their ability to take care of themselves. It is a progressive disease which creates confusion and lack of movement in muscles. Alzheimer’s patients sometimes do not eat, and refuse meals because they do not recognize food. They have lost their sense of taste and smell, and they have difficulties swallowing food.

You will have to begin by identifying the reasons why they are not eating.

via Tips for getting Alzheimers patients to eat and drink more – by Jennifer Mcdonald – Helium.

California camp for Alzheimer’s patients isn’t about memories

When Samara Howard recently dropped off her elderly mother Johnnye Jennings at a three-day camp for people with Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia, it was the first night she’d been away from Jennings in seven years.

“Normally, I only sleep maybe two hours a night because she wakes up and she wanders and she turns on the stove,” says Howard, who eventually had to quit her job to take care of her mother full-time.

“I haven’t slept through the night in years.

You hear these stories of exhaustion and frustration often from the families of the roughly 5 million Americans who have Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. Confusion, wandering and agitation are common with dementia, and usually any break in the daily routine only increases those reactions.

via Camp For Alzheimer’s Patients Isn’t About Memories : NPR.

Flamingos raise money for autism and Alzheimer’s wandering program in Massachusetts

Flamingos will soon be flocking at locations around town as the Plymouth Networking Group and Sunrise Rotary Club of Plymouth team up to raise money to assist families who cannot afford to participate in a new search and rescue program for those at risk of wandering.

Nothing’s more frightening than the thought of a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease, autism or other condition wandering away, according to local nurse Connie Hinds, a member of both the networking and Rotary clubs.

The groups plan to flock a few select locations to help increase public awareness of the new SafetyNet tracking program soon to be offered locally. Hinds said both groups share an interest in protecting local seniors. They suspect that bright pink flamingos on laws will help bring attention to the search and rescue program.

“We want to increase public awareness of the program and have fun, too,” she said. “Flamingos can’t help but get a lot of attention.”

SafetyNet outfits seniors with a personal locator unit worn on the wrist or ankle. If a loved one goes missing, Hinds said, local law enforcement and public safety agencies trained and certified on search and rescue procedures will use SafetyNet search and rescue receivers to track the radio frequency from the locator.

via Flamingos for fun and funds – Plymouth, MA – Wicked Local Plymouth.