Interview with Billerica Police Department About How SafetyNet Saves Lives

Host Sergeant Bill West interviews guests Sergeant John Harring and Ralph Poland of Safety Net. The SafetyNet® Tracking Systems Service provides law enforcement and public safety agencies with training, equipment and proven technology to help them quickly find and rescue individuals with cognitive conditions such as autism and Alzheimer’s who wander and become lost while enrolled in the SafetyNet® Tracking Systems Service.

Finding a Wanderer Quickly and Bringing Them Home

From Paradise Home Health Care

Danger, Risk, Fear, Anxiety, Stress, Confusion all set in when a loved one with impaired judgment wanders off. Wandering is a behavior not uncommon to Alzheimer’s disease, other Dementias or Autism. Children and Seniors with some type of cognitive disability may wander off – and not be able to return home safely.

Living in South Florida, it is a daily occurence to see a Silver Alert – seeking an older senior who has driven off. Wandering by foot is one thing, by car, panic, and the person must be located as soon as possible.

Some ideas are helpful in preventing the wandering:

1. Medication. 2. Top bolt on upper part of the door 3. Bells on door odf their room and leading outside 4. Hiring an aide or companion at night

and still, a determined person can get away, it happens in a moment— as any watchful parent can attest to. It is a good idea to let neighbors know if your loved one may wander, and put your fist name and phone number in their wallet so you can be called.

Fortunately, technology has come up with a quick and easy way to locate an elderly (or child, teen) family member who has “gotten away”. SafetyNet by Lo/Jack has Radio Frequency Technology put into a lightweight button worn around the wrist which can find a person, usually within 30 minutes.

Unlike other GPS types of technology, this is waterproof, locates in dense areas like woods or where there are many buildings together and it is used in conjunction with Law Enforcement.

So if you are living with and caring for a person with diminished capacity, brain damage or a dementia and wanders off, do your best to keep them safe and consider adding this extra layer of protection and peace of mind. Should your parent, grandparent get out of the house or away from you in a Mall, SafetyNet by Lo/Jack will be able to find them in short order.

Technology will help in other ways too in preventing the person from wandering off undetected but somehow, some folks still wander off so finding and returning them home safely before any danger can happen is equally important.

14-Year-Old Boy with Autism Rescued After Wandering into Woods

Shortly after 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 a Search and Rescue team from the Plymouth County Sheriff’s Department (Massachusetts) set out to look for a missing 14-year-old Norwell boy with autism who is enrolled in the SafetyNet Service.  By using the SafetyNet tracking equipment, the first responders from both the Plymouth County Sheriff’s and the Norwell Police Departments were able to pick up the boy’s Radio Frequency signal which was being emitted from the SafetyNet bracelet he wears.

Within 25 minutes the child was found hiding in a heavily wooded area a short distance from his home. He was unharmed and returned safely to his family.

This was the Plymouth County Sheriff’s Department’s third rescue of a person wearing a SafetyNet bracelet.

Like the SafetyNet Facebook Page to Donate $5!

In honor of Autism Awareness Month, SafetyNet is going to donate $5 for each new Like they get on their Facebook Page during the month of April (2012, of course!)

The money raised will be donated to The Big Red Safety Box program. Back in February, the National Autism Association announced the 2nd launch of The Big Red Safety Box, of which we were a sponsor, and all 1,000 boxes were claimed within hours.

The Big Red Safety Box includes educational materials, door alarms, a wearable ID, and visual prompts to deter children and adults from exiting their homes. Because at least 18 students with autism were reported missing over the last six months after leaving a school or school bus, visual prompts may also be used for classroom and other non-home settings.

The sooner the NAA can raise the money to put together the Big Red Safety Boxes, the sooner they can get them into the hands of those who need them!

 

Plymouth County Sheriff Uses SafetyNet Service to Locate Alzheimer’s Resident Unharmed

Deputies from the Plymouth County, MA Sheriff’s department and Halifax Police successfully deployed Tuesday night to locate an elderly Halifax resident who had wandered from home, using their SafetyNet tracking equipment that allowed searchers to locate the missing man in a matter of minutes.

Local officials reported the 79-year-old man missing shortly after 5 p.m. yesterday, officials said.  Specially trained responders arrived on scene and located the man, unharmed, in a wooded area about a quarter mile from his back door.

“As soon as we arrived, we were able to pick up a strong radio signal from the SafetyNet device,” said James Muscato, Superintendent for Law Enforcement at the Plymouth County Sheriff’s Department.  “We followed the signal with the tracking receiver (and) he was right there in some briars, but otherwise OK.”

Muscato said from the initial notification to finish, the rescue took only 45 minutes.

The Tuesday event was the first time public safety officials have successfully activated the SafetyNet tracking device since being implemented countywide in April 2011.

Thanksgiving – A Time for Reflection and Thanks

There’s a chill in the air and the trees are almost bare.  Here in New England that’s a clear sign that fall is upon us and soon the Thanksgiving holiday will be here.  Where ever you are and whatever your situation is, Thanksgiving is a perfect time to give thanks!

Personally, I’m thankful for my wonderful family, my health, my spouse, my caring co-workers, my two dogs and many many other things. I urge you to think about what you are thankful for and to let those people (and pets!) know how much you appreciate them.

As a company, we here at SafetyNet sincerely appreciate our close nit community. Our customers, followers and supporters have played a massive role in our growth and we truly appreciate and want to thank all of you.

It’s a great feeling for us when we hear about success stories like this and this, which proves our efforts to bring loved ones back home with our SafetyNet service really do work and we are in fact saving lives.

As the Thanksgiving holiday comes closer, here are some links that may be helpful to you:

Thanksgiving Travel Tips:
http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2010/11/12/dont-turkey-follow-thanksgiving-travel-tips/

Thanksgiving Cooking and Safety Tips:
http://www.catalogs.com/info/kitchen/thanksgiving-cooking-tips.html

http://www.safetyathome.com/seasonal-safety/holiday-safety-articles/thanksgiving-cooking-tips-serving-up-a-side-of-safety/

 

Thanksgiving Events – Family and Black Friday:
http://www.fchornet.com/2.2211/a-beginners-guide-to-shopping-black-friday-1.2704947#.TsaEiGPfdWA

http://www.wafb.com/story/16074437/best-buys-worst-buys-on-black-friday-2011

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/guide/family-guide-to-thanksgiving-volunteering/

http://fatherhoodchannel.com/2010/10/29/thanksgiving-family-survival-guide-2010/

Thank you for reading and we look forward to a prosperous 2012 and beyond.

Stay safe!

Jason at SafetyNet

The Benefits of Radio Frequency Technology for Finding People Who Wander

By Jennifer Morrissey
Customer Care Specialist, SafetyNet

When I attend conferences and events, I’m lucky enough to meet a lot of parents and caregivers. And it is safe to say that a lot of people don’t know what Radio Frequency is. It is also safe to say that I didn’t know much about it before I joined SafetyNet.

I feel it is important for me to say right away that each family needs to find a system that works for them, whether it’s RF, cellular or GPS. Eloping or wandering is a serious issue that affects those with cognitive conditions such as autism, Alzheimer’s, dementia, Down syndrome, brain injuries and other serious conditions. And while the families have already prepared for a wandering incident by using special locks around the house on doors and windows, alarms and fences – sometimes it is just not enough. I have heard many parents of children with autism describe their son or daughter as “Houdini.” No matter what lengths they have taken, their child is still able to get out.

It is when your loved one gets out of the safe, secure area of your home that the SafetyNet™ Service comes into play. Once you realize he is missing, you will undoubtedly call 911 about this emergency. Since law enforcement is going to do the search anyway, you may want to add the SafetyNet Service to the tool box and help bring your loved one home sooner. The average missing person search is roughly nine hours. Nowadays, you don’t have to go very far to read a story in the news or on Facebook about someone missing overnight or even for days. And with the cold weather coming, every minute counts. The SafetyNet Service could bring them home within minutes.

Now on to why I feel RF is the best locating device for a missing person.

Radio Frequency is not obstructed by concrete. Not steel. Not densely wooded areas. And, it can work in shallow water.

How many times have you had a dropped call on your cell phone? Or maybe you can’t even make cell phone calls from inside your own home or office. Sometimes your cell phone will be in a “dead zone” where you may get a “No Service” message. Basically, you need to be near cell towers in order to use a cell phone. So if you find yourself in an area where there is too much distance between the towers or no towers at all (usually in remote areas), the phone won’t be able to find a signal and therefore you’ll get “No Service.” Essentially, your loved one could be wearing a cellular device and end up somewhere without service and the signal would not get picked up.

Last week, I was using the GPS in my car and when I pulled into an underground garage, it stopped working. The reason for that is because the GPS unit needs a direct line of sight to the sky andsatellite from which it is getting the directions. Because I went into an underground structure made of concrete, the GPS could not communicate with the satellite and lost contact.

Two weeks ago, SafetyNet was used to find a missing teen with autism. The police found him within minutes in an underground subway system of Boston. Radio Frequency was able to penetrate through the subway system and onto land, where officers with the MBTA Police were able to pick up a signal using SafetyNet’s equipment and head to the location of the missing boy. You can read more about that story on BostonHerald.com.

I also mention to parents and caregivers that the equipment that public safety officers use can pick up the RF signal in the SafetyNet bracelet up to one mile on the ground and up to 7 miles in the air. SafetyNet equipment has been used multiple times by aviation units to find a missing person, including this past week in Philadelphia – http://www.metro.us/philadelphia/local/article/975850–police-missing-man-located-with-safetynet-technology.

The last thing I talk about has nothing to do with RF, but I find it incredibly important. During the training that public safety gets from SafetyNet officials, they not only learn about using the equipment but also on how to approach and interact with someone who has a cognitive condition. We here at SafetyNet take the time to learn about your loved one during the enrollment process so that we can share that information in a secure database with public safety agencies. That way, they have a sense of who your son, daughter, mother, father or loved one is before they even reach the scene. Is your son afraid of dogs? Does your father walk with a cane?

The SafetyNet Service uses tried and true RF technology. That along with trained law enforcement, you can feel good about your loved one on the SafetyNet service. Enroll before the end of September by October 15, 2011 and get waived enrollment and six months free.

.

Woman with Dementia Rescued by Marathon County Sheriff’s Office After She Wandered and Went Missing; First SafetyNet Rescue in Wisconsin

Congratulations to the Marathon County (WI) Sheriff’s Office! They were the first public safety agency in Wisconsin to use SafetyNet’s state-of-the-art technology and safely rescue a missing person who had wandered and went missing.

A 71-year-old woman with dementia wandered away from her Wausau, Wisconsin residence and went missing late last week. Just 30 seconds after deputies with the Marathon County Sheriff’s Office arrived at the missing woman’s residence (her point last seen), they located her using SafetyNet’s Search and Rescue Receivers. The woman was located behind a building near her residence.

A deputy with the Marathon County Sheriff’s Office was pleased with the speed and efficiency of the SafetyNet-enhanced search and rescue, as was the woman’s family!

At SafetyNet, we were all thrilled to hear about this terrific story. And, we want more caregivers to have an opportunity to try the service for themselves. Now through September 30th October 15th, 2011, we’re giving caregivers and parents the opportunity to try the SafetyNet service for free for six months. If during the first six months you or your loved one is not satisfied with the service for whatever reason, you are not obligated to pay anything. To learn more about this special opportunity, please visit https://www.safetynettracking.com/.

Teenager with Autism Goes Missing and Rescued by Hillsborough County Sherriff’s Office

On June 16th, a 17-year-old boy with autism who lives in Tampa, FL wandered outside of his residence and did not return. Upon realizing that he was missing, the boy’s caregiver notified the Tampa Police Department about his disappearance. The Tampa Police later learned that the boy was enrolled in SafetyNet, a service that enables public safety agencies to more effectively find and rescue individuals with cognitive conditions who are prone to wandering and becoming lost. The service features a SafetyNet Bracelet worn by a client that emits Radio Frequency signals, which can be tracked by local public safety officials via their SafetyNet Search and Rescue Receivers.

To assist with this search and rescue, the Hillsborough County Sherriff’s Office (HCSO) were notified about the incident and they immediately informed their ground and aviation units about the boy’s disappearance. Shortly thereafter, HCSO helicopter and ground units equipped with SafetyNet Search and Rescue Receivers picked up a signal from the missing boy’s bracelet. Just 15 minutes after receiving the initial Radio Frequency signal from the SafetyNet bracelet, deputies with HCSO located the boy nearly a half a mile away from his residence sleeping inside an unlocked car at an auto dealership on North Florida Avenue in Tampa. The boy was later returned to his residence unharmed.

This is the third rescue made by HCSO using SafetyNet’s technology and equipment.

Lower Merion, PA Police Captain Explains Why SafetyNet Will Benefit His Force and Community

The Lower Merion, PA Police Department is working in conjunction with the Main Line Chamber of Commerce’s Leadership Main Line Program to implement SafetyNet, a new service that helps public safety agencies search for and rescue people at risk of wandering, including children with autism. The service will be available for caregivers and their loved ones living in Lower Merion Township and Narberth beginning in June 2010.

Captain John Dougherty of the Lower Merion Police Department discusses the value of SafetyNet and how it will help the Main Line community, as well as how it will benefit public safety agencies in their search and rescue operations

Captain John Dougherty of the Lower Merion Police Department gives examples of how SafetyNet will benefit his force in their search and rescue operations