Teenager with Autism Goes Missing and Rescued by Hillsborough County Sherriff’s Office

On June 16th, a 17-year-old boy with autism who lives in Tampa, FL wandered outside of his residence and did not return. Upon realizing that he was missing, the boy’s caregiver notified the Tampa Police Department about his disappearance. The Tampa Police later learned that the boy was enrolled in SafetyNet, a service that enables public safety agencies to more effectively find and rescue individuals with cognitive conditions who are prone to wandering and becoming lost. The service features a SafetyNet Bracelet worn by a client that emits Radio Frequency signals, which can be tracked by local public safety officials via their SafetyNet Search and Rescue Receivers.

To assist with this search and rescue, the Hillsborough County Sherriff’s Office (HCSO) were notified about the incident and they immediately informed their ground and aviation units about the boy’s disappearance. Shortly thereafter, HCSO helicopter and ground units equipped with SafetyNet Search and Rescue Receivers picked up a signal from the missing boy’s bracelet. Just 15 minutes after receiving the initial Radio Frequency signal from the SafetyNet bracelet, deputies with HCSO located the boy nearly a half a mile away from his residence sleeping inside an unlocked car at an auto dealership on North Florida Avenue in Tampa. The boy was later returned to his residence unharmed.

This is the third rescue made by HCSO using SafetyNet’s technology and equipment.

Win A Chance to Play Golf Alongside SafetyNet, Doug Flutie, Celebrities and Members of the Autism Community

SafetyNet is a proud sponsor of this year’s 12th annual Doug Flutie, Jr. Celebrity Golf Classic, which is taking place on Tuesday, June 21 at the Pinehills Golf Club in Plymouth, MA. The event is one of Greater Boston’s premier charity golf tournaments and has raised more than $1.8 million for the Doug Flutie, Jr. Foundation for Autism.

As part of our sponsorship, we’re giving one (1) of our fans on Twitter and Facebook the opportunity to join our foursome! You’ll enjoy a great day of golf with lunch, dinner, cocktails, contests and more!

To enter, simply follow SafetyNetSource on Twitter and RT our Doug Flutie, Jr. Golf Classic posts or “Like” us on Facebook . The drawing runs today through Friday, June 10. The winner will be announced on Monday, June 13.

Drawing Rules and Regulations

Summer Safety and Children with Autism

It’s never too soon to start thinking about summer, especially here in the Northeast, where it has rained every day for the past week! Care2.com recently did a post on thinking about the needs associated with a child with autism and their transition to summer, especially when it comes to the issue of summer safety. At SafetyNet, we’ve recorded a podcast that addresses several topics related to summer safety and children with autism. Take a listen.  What are some of the protective measures that you take to help keep loved ones safe from wandering, particularly during the summer?

SafetyNet available in Davie, Florida

Finding a missing loved-one that has wandered off can be as simple as tracking a radio signal.

The Davie Police Department has joined the SafetyNet program that provides wrist or ankle bracelets for people suffering from cognitive issues such as Alzheimer’s Disease or Autism who may wander off and become lost.

The SafetyNet program is offered to qualified law enforcement and public safety agencies at no cost, according to the SafetyNet Web site. The free training includes learning how to use the search and rescue equipment and in-depth training and certification of it, technology and procedures for performing a search and rescue operation.

via SafetyNet Technology To Help Find Wandering Elderly « CBS Miami.

Marino Foundation WalkAbout draws thousands to fight Autism

A beautiful day for the Marino Foundation WalkAbout Autism (Photo Courtesy Miami Dade Police)

A beautiful day for the Marino Foundation WalkAbout Autism (Photo Courtesy Miami Dade Police)

Congratulations to former Miami Dolphins quarterback Dan Marino and the 6,000-plus people who participated in Saturday’s Dan Marino Foundation WalkAbout Autism!

The Miami fundraising walk raised more than $400,000 for autism research. Among those helping – Marino’s son, Michael, 22, who was diagnosed with autism 20 years ago, and Dolphins General Manager Jeff Ireland, dad to twin teenage girls autism.

SafetyNet is proud to have been a sponsor of this exciting, successful event.

Friday, as DJ1Tre set up his equipment on the Sun Life Stadium field for Saturday’s Dan Marino Foundation WalkAbout Autism, he took in the empty stadium. He’d seen the place full and rocking when his father used to work there. But he found it hard to believe 6,000 people would be on the field Saturday.

“I was out there earlier, it really is 6,000 people. It truly is a great day,” said DJ1Tre, a 22-year-old also known as Michael Marino, son of former Dolphins Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino and a college graduate diagnosed as autistic 20 years ago.

“Mike is a miracle really,” Dan Marino said. “When it comes to a young kid diagnosed at 2 years old, now graduated college, doing great. … I get choked up thinking about it. He’s a good kid, a good kid. Today’s special for me. He’s going to be out there working, doing a little spinning and being a part of this. To know the kind of impact he’s had not only on our lives, but the situation we were in, been able to help a lot of other people. That’s what’s good about it.”

A crowd gathered outside Sun Life Stadium, clad in T-shirts trumpeting their group supporting autism research and care. In one group were the members of Raiders For Autism, representing Fort Lauderdale St. Thomas Aquinas High School. In another group were Otters 4 Autism from Weston Everglades Elementary. Here, there, and everywhere were personally themed teams such as Justin’s Village and Joshua’s Jaywalkers, the latter named for 5-year-old Joshua Corliss.

“He was diagnosed a couple of weeks ago, so we’re here to support the cause,” said Debby Corliss, a Pembroke Pines dentist.

via Marino Foundation WalkAbout draws crowd, raises money to fight Autism – David J. Neal – MiamiHerald.com.

SafetyNet now available in Boston to help protect people with autism, Alzheimer’s who wander

SafetyNet announced at a press conference that its SafetyNet service is now available in the city of Boston. SafetyNet helps caregivers provide an added layer of protection for loved ones with cognitive conditions such as autism and Alzheimer’s from the life-threatening behavior of wandering. The service also provides public safety agencies with the tools and training to more effectively find and rescue those individuals if they wander and go missing.

The Boston Police Department has been trained and certified on the SafetyNet service, as well as equipped with search and rescue equipment. The department can now use the SafetyNet service to find and rescue people at risk who go missing. SafetyNet eliminates the countless man-hours that can be required in traditional search and rescue operations.

“In Massachusetts, statistics show that there are approximately 10,000 school aged children with autism and an estimated 120,000 people with Alzheimer’s. We’re very proud to offer this service, which can provide caregivers with additional peace of mind about protecting their loved ones,” said Kathy Kelleher, Vice President, SafetyNet. “Boston joins the growing list of Massachusetts communities that now offer the SafetyNet service. SafetyNet has already rescued residents in other parts of the state—and country, including the dramatic rescue of an 8-year-old boy in Quincy, Mass. who had wandered into the ocean and was rescued by local police in just 14 minutes using SafetyNet’s tracking equipment.”

To bring this valuable service to Boston, SafetyNet worked closely with the Boston Police Department. SafetyNet provided 14 sets of electronic tracking systems to Boston police. In addition, SafetyNet officials and industry experts provided certified training for police officers in each of the 11 districts located in Boston on the use of its specialized equipment to find and rescue individual clients enrolled in the service. The Search and Rescue Receivers, certified training and ongoing support are provided at no cost to the Boston Police Department or taxpayers.

How SafetyNet Works

Once caregivers enroll their loved ones in the service, they receive a SafetyNet Bracelet, which is worn by the person at risk typically on their wrist or ankle. The caregiver provides information about the client to assist in search and rescue, which is then entered into a secure database. SafetyNet provides 24×7 emergency caregiver support.

The SafetyNet Bracelet constantly emits a Radio Frequency signal. Radio Frequency is the technology of choice because, unlike cellular and GPS technology, its signal doesn’t rely on cellular networks or satellite signals and can often be tracked when a client wanders into a shallow body of water, a densely wooded area, a concrete structure such as a garage, or a building constructed with steel.

The Search and Rescue Receivers used by public safety agencies can detect the Radio Frequency signal emitted from a SafetyNet Bracelet typically within a range of approximately one mile in on-the-ground searches and 5-7 miles in searches by helicopter.

The SafetyNet certified training for public safety agencies focuses on its specialized electronic equipment, technology, procedures and on how to effectively communicate with and approach individuals who have cognitive conditions. SafetyNet’s secure database contains information on each individual client enrolled in the service so that the search and rescue team can have information on the individual’s personal habits and how he or she should be approached, spoken to and comforted.

Resources for Caregivers

SafetyNet offers SafetyNetSource, an online information and resource center designed to assist caregivers seeking tips on how to protect their loved ones who wander. SafetyNetSource offers compelling content from across the web, access to the SafetyNetSource Twitter feed and YouTube channel, a Facebook page to help caregivers communicate with one another and engage in a community of support, plus a variety of valuable resources for caregivers such as a form to distribute to the local first responders and neighbors that may be helpful in the event their loved one wanders.

Availability & More Information

For more information about SafetyNet, please call (877) 4-FINDTHEM (877-434-6384) or visit safetynettracking.com

via New Service That Helps Police Find and Rescue People Who Wander Now Available… — BOSTON,  Jan. 26, 2011 /PRNewswire/ –.

SafetyNet proud to partner with Flutie Foundation for Autism

The Eighth Annual Flutie Bowl will raise money for autism programs as ticket holders mingle with the football great and other local sports figures and celebrities at Kings in Legacy Place on Jan. 20.

Proceeds go the Doug Flutie Jr. Foundation for Autism, a charity that Flutie and his wife, Laurie, established in 1998 in honor of their son Doug Jr., who was diagnosed with autism at age 3.

“The Flutie Bowl is a great event that brings together people who really care about the autism community,” said Flutie, who’s best remembered for his winning “hail Mary” pass as quarterback of the 1984 Boston College football team. “We always have a great time bowling and playing music. We encourage everyone to come out to Kings, and support autism and the foundation.

”This year’s event marks the beginning of a partnership between the foundation and SafetyNet, which makes a bracelet that enables police to track people at risk of wandering or becoming lost. SafetyNet will give the bracelets to financially strapped families with autistic children who could benefit from the device.

via Flutie Bowl at Kings to benefit autism programs – Dedham – Your Town – Boston.com.

Florida man with dementia wanders, found with SafetyNet

Robert Monroe is 68 years old. He has had brain surgery and now suffers from dementia-like symptoms. On Sunday morning at 8:30 a.m., he left his house in the Sullivan Ranch neighborhood of Mount Dora, Lake County. But his normal walk turned out to be anything but for whatever reason.

Monroe just kept walking and walking and walking. In 5.5 hours, he walked 9.5 miles. He wound up at the J&M Convenience Store in Apopka off of Highway 441.

Store owner Julio Garcia immediately gave Monroe water for his apparent signs of dehydration.

“I asked him where he comes from. He didn’t know. I asked him where he slept last night. He didn’t know. I asked him where he was going. He said he was going to Orlando. I asked how he could go to Orlando on a highway like 441,” remembers Garcia.

Little did Garcia know that the Lake County Sheriff’s Office was just minutes from rescuing Monroe from his wandering walk. All thanks to a little gadget called the SafetyNet Bracelet.

Knowing that he was wearing the bracelet, Monroe’s wife had called the Sheriff’s Office to report him missing. In turn, they powered up a bunch of receivers in a helicopter and patrol cars that use radio frequency that can communicate with Monroe’s bracelet. Once they got a general idea of where he was, they got more specific pings with a hand-held receiver.

“Sometimes you might look for someone who does not have this equipment, doesn’t have a transmitter, it might be days before you locate the person,” says Sgt. Karen Lovelace of the Lake County Sheriff’s Office.

SafetyNet available in Hillsborough County, Florida

SafetyNet is now available in Hillsborough County, Florida, to help find people with autism, Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome and other cognitive conditions who wander.

The same technology used to track animals and cars is now being used to track people.

The Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office uses the technology and says it will save lives.

Sergeant Jeff Massaro listens for a beep because that sound will lead him to a missing person.

“Those old shows where they were tracking migratory patterns of animals, this is the technology,” Massaro said.

While the radio frequency technology is old, it is now being used to find people.Massaro says people with dementia, alzheimer’s, and children that are autistic can benefit from the technology.

via Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office says technology using radio frequency finds people that wander..

Coventry, R.I., using SafetyNet to find missing people

Coventry is the latest community to begin using SafetyNet technology to track down missing people.

On Tuesday, the Coventry Fire Department demonstrated the new SafetyNet system.

Designed for people with Alzhheimer’s Disease, autism, or other cognitive disorders, the SafetyNet system comes with a transmitter that the patient wears on their wrist. If the person goes missing, the fire department can usually locate them within a matter of minutes.

via Coventry using SafetyNet technology to find missing people | WPRI.com.