Autism’s effect on siblings, a sister’s research

Much of the research on the effect of autism on siblings is done by … adult researchers. This post is about a research project by a New Jersey 16-year-old who is the sister of a boy with autism.

When Gabby Abramowitz was younger, she was cautious about inviting new friends to the house. She wasn’t sure how they would react to her younger brother, Ben, who is autistic.

And she didn’t want a repeat of the Simpsons incident. That was the time she had a friend over for dinner, and Ben sat at the table reciting the entire “Treehouse of Horror” Simpsons Halloween special.Gabby pleaded with him to stop, but he persisted.”

My friend was like, ‘What’s going on?’ and then started laughing,” she said.

At that time, she was in elementary school and lacked the words and understanding to explain her brother’s condition. But with the help of her parents and through her own study, Gabby, now 16 and a sophomore at Tenafly High School, has grown to understand the nuances of autism and often speaks out to teach her peers while growing closer to Ben, 14.

Through her research, she found that her experiences, and those of others like her, often are overlooked. “I think the effect on siblings is underestimated. We get pushed into the background.”

via NorthJersey.com: Autism’s effect on the ‘normal siblings’.

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