Alzheimer’s: Memories slip, but golf is forever

Do you care for an Alzheimer’s patient who used to be a passionate golfer? Check out the website Eat Sleep Golf’s two-part series on golfing Alzheimer’s patients.

Millions of golf enthusiasts have waxed endlessly about the game’s mystical power and its hold on the human mind. A handful of people with Alzheimer’s disease, no longer able to dress or nourish themselves without assistance, are proving them right.

A little after 9 a.m. last week, Wardell Johnston declared he wanted to be left alone. Confused and annoyed by the activities and tasks confronting him, the 87-year-old Alzheimer’s sufferer shut his door at the Silverado Senior Living home in Belmont, Calif.

Just hours later, Mr. Johnston was measuring the uphill, right-to-left break on a 12-foot putt and knocking his ball into the hole. Then the former civil engineer, who played the game regularly as a younger man, ambled over to the driving range. He grabbed a six iron and practiced chipping with the sort of easy, stress-free swing duffers half his age could learn something from.

“I quit,” he said with a cocky grin after each successful shot. Then he deftly cradled another ball with his club, moving it into position for the next stroke. “I haven’t played a lot lately,” he added. “I should, though. I’ve still got all the strokes.”

Part One of Memories Slip, but Golf is Forever

Part Two of Memories Slip, but Golf is Forever

via Eat Sleep Golf: Memories Slip, but Golf is Forever.

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